Projects

  • Los Angeles, California: A new pool and tennis complex, which provides recreational facilities and brings the College’s facilities up to NCAA competition standards while complementing the school’s foundation architecture, designed by Myron Hunt.

  • Westwood, California: Located in historic Westwood Village and currently under construction, Plaza la Reina is a 44-room residential hotel above retail surrounding a public courtyard.

  • West Hollywood, California: Situated in the City's heart, the La Peer is a 63,000-square-foot mixed-use project that seamlessly blends a 70-room hotel, several penthouse residences, a restaurant and high-end retail.

  • Pasadena, California: A 155,000-square-foot mixed-use development located on a 58,000-square-foot site in Pasadena’s historic Playhouse District, organized around a series of courtyards and paseos.

  • Panama Pacifico, Republic of Panama: A 950-acre neighborhood that abuts a sloping forest on the decommissioned Howard Air Base which has been carefully designed in response to Panama's tropical climate.

  • Pasadena, California: A 21-unit multi-family residential project designed per the City of Gardens Standards that revive the traditional courtyard housing type of Southern California.

  • Claremont, California: This 130-bed residence hall is located on a narrow site along the northern edge of the campus overlooking the college’s athletic field.

  • Santa Monica, California: West Wilshire is a three-story, mixed-use, 30-unit courtyard housing project located on a one-acre site on the south side of Wilshire Boulevard between 23rd and 24th Streets.

  • Panama Pacifico, Republic of Panama: A modest 40-unit project designed as a traditional court that responds to the tropical climate of Panama with passive cooling, protection from the sun and rain and appropriate materials incorporated into the design.

  • Seaside, Florida: Located on a narrow mixed-use commercial site, this project provides 27 residential units, 1300 square feet of commercial space, a 300-square-foot community room and 31 subterranean parking spaces.

  • Pasadena, California: The restoration of a 17,000-square-foot Italian Revival courtyard structure in Pasadena converts the 1929 building into a music school with recital halls, updated classrooms, studios, administrative offices and new performance spaces.

  • Designed as part of Los Poblanos Inn in Albuquerque, the Rembe House is in the straightforward, poetic style of Rio Grande farmhouses, featuring simple exterior materials and a modest plan which contrast with rich and spacious interiors.

  • Albuquerque, New Mexico: A transformation of Los Poblanos and La Quinta into a country inn and sustainable farm solved the complex preservation and development pressures that faced the historic property.

  • Sarasota, Florida: Located at the entrance to the campus, this LEED Gold-rated office and classroom building is among the most prominent structures at the College. It is also the first of a series of buildings to form its main quadrangle.

  • Santa Clara, California: An updated plan for Adobe Lodge and Nobili Hall, located in the University’s oldest buildings, renews and preserves the character of the campus’s most important historic precinct while accommodating modern needs.

  • Rolling Hills, California: This renovation and addition to a 7,600-square-foot mid-1970s house draws inspiration from the floating homes of Southeast Asia and features a series of dramatic water features.

  • San Francisco, California: Located on the former home of Hunters Point Shipyard and Candlestick Park, this project's two blocks of urban infill are coordinated with a larger Master Plan that creates a new residential community.

  • Lancaster, California: The City's downtown redevelopment and strategies to bring more pedestrian activity to the main street prompted the relocation of the Lancaster Art Museum to an existing 1950s building in the City’s downtown.

  • Dubai, United Arab Emirates: This 77-acre, 400-unit Neighborhood, part of the 20-square-mile Arabian Canal city in Dubai, was conceived in response to a need for housing for foreign workers.

  • Los Angeles, California: Located high in the spectacular Angeles Crest National Forest, this new Visitors' Center includes a museum, an outdoor stargazing amphitheater and a residential inn for the historic Mount Wilson Observatory campus.

  • Rolling Hills Estates, California: This 18-unit mixed-use project is among the first developments designed following the implementation of the Moule & Polyzoides Deep Valley Master Plan Guidelines.

  • Pasadena, California: Fair Oaks Court is an affordable housing project that combines classic bungalow style with the typology of courtyard housing in one of Pasadena’s older pedestrian-oriented Neighborhoods.

  • Brentwood, California: A 49-unit housing project on a one-acre site, Dunstan Way is a Mediterranean-style complex organized around two major internal court­yards, providing both private and public outdoor space to residents.

  • Claremont, California: The new 30,000-square-foot field house, completed in the fall of 2008, was designed for recreational and social use by Scripps students and faculty.

  • Pasadena, California: Del Mar Station is a Transit-Oriented Development surrounding a prominent Metro Rail stop on the Gold Line, which connects Los Angeles and Pasadena.

  • Pasadena, California: The restoration of the Vista del Arroyo Bungalows has transformed one of Pasadena’s most historic yet most neglected places into luxury housing on a dramatic location adjacent to the iconic Colorado Street Bridge.

  • Pismo Beach, California: Located within walking distance of the beach, 331 Wadsworth is an infill project that provides mixed-use and for-sale urban housing with cottage-style residential buildings and Spanish- and maritime-style commercial structures

  • Pasadena, California: Granada Court brings courtyard housing to the Playhouse District with 31 luxury apartments over a 50-car subterranean parking garage.

  • Hollywood, California: Located in the heart of old Hollywood near Sunset and Vine, 6630 Sunset Boulevard draws upon the Art Deco tradition of Hollywood’s boom in the 1920s and 1930s with a contemporary interpretation of that style.

  • Los Angeles, California: A 450,000-square-foot mixed-use building sited directly across from a major downtown Metro station, Pico & Flower is an 18-story Mixed-Use Transit-Oriented Development on 1.13 acres.

  • Ventura, California: Situated near the historic San Buenaventura Mission, this project reintroduces the courtyard housing typology of Southern California’s past with 41 units over a 50-car subterranean parking garage.

  • Beverly Hills, California: This 8,000-square-foot single-family home, conceived with simplicity of form and materials, recalls the tradition of architectural elegance associated with Southern California homes of the 1920s.

  • Ventura, California: This nearly two-acre Mixed-Use Development is situated on the eastern edge of downtown in a revitalizing District.

  • West Hollywood, California: The Sunset Hotel & Residences draw inspiration from the rich Southern California courtyard tradition, providing 20 condominium units and 60 hotel rooms.

  • San Simeon, California: The preservation of San Simeon Village entails transforming the 23-acre site into an inn based on the interpretation of the plan first drawn by Julia Morgan in the 1920s.

  • South Pasadena, California: A transit-oriented development adjacent to a light rail station, Mission Meridian provides 67 condominiums and 5,000 square feet of retail space for those interested in commuting by train.

  • Santa Ana, California: Located north of downtown on a one-acre site, this mixed-use project consists of 45 units of housing configured around four unique courtyards that vary in orientation, size and massing.

  • Ventura, California: Located on a sloping site with beautiful ocean views in Ventura's pedestrian-oriented downtown, 42 North Chestnut is a mixed-use and Adaptive Reuse project with 51 condominium units on a nearly two-acre site.

  • Ruidoso Downs, New Mexico: Moule & Polyzoides guided the site planning, development of housing types and design of the Community Center for this affordable housing development located on a hillside overlooking Ruidoso Downs in southeast New Mexico.

  • Los Angeles, California: This fifteen-acre heavily sloped site is located at Veteran and Weyburn southwest of the main UCLA campus and facing Los Angeles National Cemetery.

  • Duarte, California: Five attached and 24 detached cottages are organized in various configurations around two linear garden courts connected with paseos and walkways on a richly landscaped 2.5-acre site.

  • Azusa, California: A component of Azusa’s new General Plan and Development Code, Azusa Station establishes a future Gold Line light rail station as the northern anchor to the City’s downtown.

  • Long Beach, California: Located on two city blocks in a residential Neighborhood, this project transforms the area into a memorable Village Center with the addition of 53 affordable rental units and the implementation of traffic-calming measures and landscape improvements.

  • Shafter, California: Located on a twenty-acre parcel of land on the edge of an agricultural town in Central California, this affordable housing community of 81 homes accommodates farm laborers and their families.

  • Santa Monica, California: Among the greenest buildings in the world, the LEED-Platinum Robert Redford Building for the NRDC houses the organization's west coast headquarters.

  • Pasadena, California: Moule & Polyzoides completed the rehabilitation of the Neff Ruppel offices in 1998 and has made the building its professional home ever since.

  • West Hollywood, California: Harper Court revives the courtyard type in Los Angeles, with twenty units organized around four courtyards that feature fountains, exterior fireplaces and rich landscaping throughout.

  • Albuquerque, New Mexico: The Alvarado Center plan repairs the damages that 1960s urban renewal brought to Albuquerque’s historic center, adding retail, housing and offices and guiding the reconstruction of the Alavardo Hotel and the Santa Fe Depot.

  • Pasadena, California: The Polytechnic School’s new 14,578-square-foot swimming pool facility hosts an active aquatic program for the most prominent private school in the western United States, with swimming, diving, water polo and other competitive sports as well as recreational swimming.

  • Tucson, Arizona: The 25,000-square-foot Neighborhood Center for the new town of Civano incorporates covered patios, shaded courtyards, deeply recessed openings, rammed-earth and adobe walls, wind towers and other passive cooling techniques.

  • Tucson, Arizona: A component of one of the first New Urbanist projects to integrate traditional planning principles with an advanced environmental protocol, the Civano New Town Patio Homes incorporate a variety of passive sustainable design and construction principles.

  • Pasadena, California: This 1908 structure designed by Myron Hunt was renovated, elevating its exhibition spaces to the highest level of performance while carefully maintaining historic architectural character.

  • Los Angeles, California: The original aesthetic of the administration and reception room at Village Green was restored, uncovering a mural by noted Los Angeles artist Rico Lebrun, rehabilitating the building fabric and transforming the space into a community room.

  • Pasadena, California: Meridian Court, situated on a small infill site in a mixed-use Neighborhood, is within walking distance of two Gold Line transit stations and the major commercial centers of Pasadena.

  • Santa Monica, California: Badly damaged by the Northridge earthquake, this 1920s beach front estate designed by Julia Morgan has been restored and transformed into a community center with a restaurant, public gathering places and an interpretive center.

  • Los Angeles, California: Decommissioned in 1994, this plan for an historic Roman Catholic Cathedral preserves the building and transforms it into a Museum of Latino Culture.

  • Pasadena, California: The restoration and expansion of historic Gartz Court included moving the structures almost three miles from their original location and adding garages and backyards to transform the original bungalow apartments into full-fledged houses.

  • Tucson, Arizona: Colonia de la Paz Residence Hall was the first building to be designed implementing the Highland District Master Plan designed by Moule & Polyzoides.

  • Monrovia, California: Located on a typical Southern California suburban arterial road, Magnolia Court provides sixteen units of affordable housing in a courtyard setting.

  • Claremont, California: The restoration of Balch Hall revitalizes this 1929 building, including its large performance hall and accompanying gardens.

  • Located on 125 acres and hour away from Manhattan, this six-bedroom, 20,000-square-foot house designed for elegant country living is surprisingly intimate, with great design attention given to outdoor extensions and to the highly detailed interiors.

  • Claremont, California: Lyon Court is an addition to Harwood Court, a historic dormitory built in the 1920s just south of Pomona College’s main quadrangle.

Recognition

Press

  • Public Square editor Robert Steuteville interviewed Elizabeth Moule and Emily Talen on the The Charter of the New Urbanism and how it has shaped cities and towns and whether it needs to be updated.

  • Local coverage of the recently approved plan for redevelopment of the St. John's Seminary site in San Antonio, Texas which will include design services by Moule & Polyzoides.

  • A profile of upcoming Pasadena Playhouse District projects including the Playhouse Plaza Tower.

  • Harper Court: Seven Fountains featured as a Los Angeles Times "Home of the Week."

  • Planetizen managing editor Jonathan Nettler interviews Vinayak Bharne about the genesis of his book, what defines Asian cities and how planners need to alter their practices to engage with them.

  • Kaid Benfield reports about the Moule & Polyzoides redesign of Lancaster Boulevard, which has transformed the City's downtown and how it fits with Lancaster's enlightened planning initiatives.

  • Civano is a test case for New Urbanism versus sprawl. The former generates more value according to economic, environmental, and social indicators.

  • Kaid Benfield blogs about the 2012 winners of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Smart Growth Achievement Awards.

  • Los Angeles Times article about the Lancaster Bouelvard Transformation receiving the EPA's National Award for Smart Growth Achievement.

  • Case study of South Pasadena's Mission Meridian Village in "Build a Better Burb / The Long Island Index"

  • Case study of Mission Meridian Village, published in Greater Greater Washington blog.

  • Greg Konar, AICP visits Lancaster Boulevard for the first time in seven years to enjoy the cafes and shopping and experience the "astonishing" transformation of Lancaster Boulevard, which is now "the hottest street in Antelope Valley."

  • Princeton Alumni Weekly blog post about the publication of "The Plazas of New Mexico."

  • "Curbed LA" report about the Moule & Polyzoides design for the 145,000-square-foot commercial project planned for Pasadena's historic Playhouse District.

  • John Dutton, AIA, inverviews Stefanos Polyzoides for the "GRIDS" blog about the recently published book.

  • "New Mexico in Focus" host Gene Grant interviews "Plazas of New Mexico" collaborators Chris Wilson and Miguel Gandert for New Mexico PBS.

  • Elizabeth Moule discusses the Moule & Polyzoides New Urbanist philosophy, its sustainable practices and bridging the gap between modernity and historical traditions.

  • Los Angeles Times interview with Stefanos Polyzoides, who reflects on his early years and education, the New Urbanism, pet peeves and current projects—plus living, loving, and working with his partner, Elizabeth Moule.

  • American Bungalow magazine article about history and preservation of Gartz Court in Pasadena.

  • In this Center for Creative Land Recycling video, local residents share their own perspectives about redevelopment of Hunters Point in San Francisco.

  • American Bungalow magazine profiles Fair Oaks Court, a "stunning 21st-century version of a bungalow court."

  • Urban Land Institute article about our integrated design approach to sustainability in the LEED-Platinum Robert Redford Building for the NRDC, which included many passive strategies as well as high-tech solutions to green design.

  • Kai Ryssdal interviews Elizabeth Moule about Mission Meridian Village and the changing habits of American commuters.

  • Scripps College alumni magazine reports about the eagerly awaited opening of the Sallie Tiernan Field House.

  • A CBS news report about new signs that Americans are beginning to make big changes in where they live, what they drive and how they get to work as gas prices zoom ever higher.

  • The Wall Street Journal reports about changing housing and commuting habits of Americans, focusing on Del Mar Station.

  • New Urban News reports about how our River North District Master Plan will revitalize an underutilized 377-acre precinct and extend San Antonio's beloved Riverwalk.

  • Del Mar Station sets an example for car-free, sustainable living writes Pasadena Magazine of the innovative mixed-use, transit-oriented development.

  • An in-depth look at green buildings designed for environmental organizations, featuring a profile of the Robert Redford Building for the NRDC.

  • Harper Court: Seven Fountains is featured in this Multihousing Professional article about the revivial of Mediterranean-inspired courtyard housing.

  • Mercado Neighborhood, the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council and Del Mar Station Transit Village are featured in this book of exemplary urban design.

  • A guide to form-based coding, with a forward by Stefanos Polyzoides.

  • Ms. Magazine profiles women who have taken the lead in building sustainable places to live and work, featuring the Robert Redford Building for the NRDC and its architect, Elizabeth Moule.

  • The Los Angeles Times examines the collaboration between Creative Housing Associates and Moule & Polyzoides that led to the award-winning mixed-use TOD, Mission Meridian Village.

  • Pasadena Star News writes about the restoration of the Vista del Arroyo Bungalows.

  • Interior Design magazine profiles two of our recent courtyard housing projects and how they are changing the direction of Los Angeles housing.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports about the controversy between New Urbanist and Modernist architects stirred by the post-Hurricane Katrina charrette in Biloxi.

  • New York Times article about frustration with ever worsening traffic features Del Mar Station Transit Village.

  • New York Times article about the national charrette that provided emergency urban design services for the reconstruction of Biloxi, Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina.

  • Los Angeles Times article about the revival of courtyard housing, focusing on Harper Court: Seven Fountains.

  • Period Homes article about two of our courtyard housing projects in Southern California that are “proving the renewed vitality of the form.”

  • New Urban News article about South Pasadena's Mission Meridian Village which the author calls one of the "most striking examples of dense mixed-use development along the Los Angeles region's expanding network of light-rail lines."

  • The Planning Report interviews Stefanos Polyzoides about the opportunities that the Los Angeles region faces.

  • AirTalk's Larry Mantle discusses New Urbanism with Stefanos Polyzoides, Ventura City Manager Rick Cole and Creative Housing Associates President Michael Dieden.

  • Residential Architect magazine writes about Harper Court: Seven Fountains.

  • Terrain.org interview with Stefanos Polyzoides that ranges from New Urbanist philosophy to the Community of Civano, Del Mar Station, desert urbanism and the architecture of place.

  • In response to the growing awareness of the effect that buildings have on the natural environment, Jeffrey Kaye of KCET-LA reports on efforts to build in a sustainable manner, focusing on the LEED-Platinum Robert Redford Building that we designed for the NRDC.

  • The Pasadena Star-News discusses New Urbanism, the future growth of Pasadena, and the work of Moule & Polyzoides with the firm’s partners on the occasion of CNU XIII: The Polycentric City, which was held in Pasadena.

  • Coastal Living magazine profiles the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • Civano resident writes in Terrain.org of his frustration and disappointment that the Civano developer abandoned the project’s original vision of creating a resource-efficient, pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use community.

  • Princeton Alumni Weekly reports on the efforts of Elizabeth Moule and Stefanos Polyzoides to reform the urbanism of the Los Angeles metropolis and to reconnect the city with its history.

  • Weekend America interview with Elizabeth Moule as she tours the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • Los Angeles needs thoughtful urbanists such as Moule & Polyzoides, not insensitive starchitects, writes Gloria Ohland in the LA Weekly.

  • Interior Design magazine profiles the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • In an article about the trend towards green building practices, the National Geographic News profiles the Robert Redford Building for the NRDC.

  • Pasadena Star-News reports about the plans to rehabilitate the Vista del Arroyo bungalows.

  • Case study of the The Robert Redford Building for Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • Los Angeles Times article about transit villages in Southern California, featuring Mission Meridian Village.

  • The Next American City reports about the opening of the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • Grist reports about the opening of the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • KCRW's Warren Olney reports on the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • New York Times article about the opening of the Robert Redford Building for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

  • The "green from top to bottom" Robert Redford Building the the NRDC is profiled on its opening day by the Los Angeles Times.

  • Architecture Magazine interview with Stefanos Polyzoides about anti-sprawl development.

  • Report from the Council on the New Urbanism, focusing on style and codes. Features three Moule & Polyzoides projects: Los Alamos Downtown Master Plan, King City Downtown Addition & Eastern Extension Specific Plan and Stone Avenue/Speedway Boulevard Gateway Project.

  • New Urban News article about the revitalization of Downtown Albuquerque, featuring Alvarado Center.

  • Pasadena Star-News article about the rehabilitation of the Vista del Arroyo Bungalows.

  • Pasadena Weekly article about Del Mar Station Transit Village.

  • Architecture Week article about Moule & Polyzoides courtyard housing projects in Southern California, featuring Mission Meridian Village and Harper Court: Seven Fountains.

  • The Town Paper article about Harper Court: Seven Fountains, Los Angeles’ first courtyard complex in 70 years.

  • Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design article about courtyard housing in Southern California, featuring three of our projects

  • Report from the Council on the New Urbanism, focusing on urban infill development. Features three Moule & Polyzoides projects: Del Mar Station Transit Village, Mission Meridian Village and UCLA SW Campus Graduate Student Housing. Includes two essays by Stefanos Polyzoides: "Housing Fabric as Town Form" and "The Plazas of New Mexico."

  • Los Angeles Magazine article about Harper Court: Seven Fountains.

  • An article in Grid about a new form of real estate financing that underwrites innovative forms of development such as the East Downtown Broadway Central Corridor.

  • New Urban News article about the East Downtown Broadway Central Corridor project.

  • Los Angeles Times article profiling the partners and the philosophy behind their practice.

  • Report of the First Council of the CNU, including articles about Civano New Town.

  • John Dutton's book explores how many American architects have reclaimed urban and suburban land development as an important, contemporary architectural issue. Included are critiques of Alvarado Center, Hueco New Town, Civano, Los Angeles Downtown Strategic Plan and Playa Vista.

  • Places article by Todd Bressi about Alvarado Center in Albuquerque.

  • Catalog published in conjunction with the exhibition, Dynamic City, presented at the Centre International pour la Ville, l'Architecture et le Paysage in Brussels, Belgium (in French).

  • Wall Street Journal article about the East Downtown Broadway Central Corridor project, which revitalizes an important downtown neighborhood in Albuquerque.

  • A Terrain.org case study of Civano New Town, the sustainable community designed by Moule & Polyzoides just outside of Tucson, Arizona.

  • An exploration of how and why twentieth-century architecture has contributed to environmental degradation. Case studies, including the University of Arizona Highland District Master Plan, provide guidelines for ameliorating such abuse.

  • Catalog to the 1994 exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, which included Playa Vista and the Los Angeles Downtown Strategic Plan.

  • A guide to the New Urbanism, with case studies of many pioneering projects, including three by Moule & Polyzoides: Playa Vista, University of Arizona Highland District Master Plan and the Los Angeles Downtown Strategic Plan.

  • A survey of Los Angeles' most provocative buildings and landmarks, with an architectural analysis of the entire period of the city's development. Includes contextual discussion of several Moule & Polyzoides projects: Pomona College Harwood-Lyon Court, Beverly Hills Golden Triangle Enhancement, Los Angeles Downtown Strategic Plan and Playa Vista.

  • L.A. Architect article by Peter Deveraux about Playa Vista project.

Talks

News

Thoughts

  • A tribute to Michael Graves on the occasion of his death, with a contribution by Stefanos, who was his student at Princeton in the late 1960s.

  • In 2011, George J. Moreno & Partners and Moule & Polyzoides joined professional forces to provide urbanist and architectural services to Panamanian clients and have now completed over a dozen projects together.

  • Introductory essay to our exhibition at the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art's Ten-Year Anniversary Celebration, which argues that an Architecture of place that incrementally constructs the city and establishes a sustaining relationship with nature benefits both the economy and the culture.

  • Stefanos Polyzoides gave a keynote speech at the Re:Street Conference which explored the new science of streets and the form of the future city.

  • Elizabeth Moule & Stefanos Polyzoides joined other world-renowned urban design theorists and practitioners to investigate the nexus of social life and urban form at the Stockholm One-Day Seminar & Debates on Placemaking and New Urbanism.

  • Introduction to the forthcoming book by José Antonio Pérez examining the patio houses of Lagos de Moreno in Jalisco, Mexico.

  • Director of Design Vinayak Bharne has edited this collection of twenty-four scholarly essays, including four of his own, that surveys the multifarious urbanities and urbanisms that constitute the Asian urban landscape.

  • Final presentation to the Al Jamea tus Saifiyah competition jury for the master plan of their campus in Nairobi.

  • An analysis of how Quincy Place would fit into the fabric of Seaside.

  • Stefanos Polyzoides discusses housing design in the context of neighborhoods, with Mission Meridian Village in South Pasadena as his backdrop.

  • This landmark volume documents the urban history of the State of New Mexico, one of the most architecturally distinguished places in the United States.

  • Throughout human history, people have settled the land based on two fundamental desires, to be both in motion and in place.

  • Density is a planning metric that describes the spatial and physical dimensions of crowding in human settlements.

  • The New Campus and Village at Cañada Larga for the Brooks Institute of Photography in Ventura, California incorporates a comprehensive sustainability strategy in both planning and architecture.

  • In addition to housing new classrooms and faculty offices, New College stipulated that their new academic center be both an exceptionally sustainable structure as well as a comfortable refuge during Florida’s tropical storms.

  • A pedestrian-oriented and Neighborhood-based Urbanism, fully integrated with offices, stores, parks and civic buildings and linked with public transit systems, is inherent to a truly sustainable Urbanism.

  • A set of operating principles for human settlement that reestablishes the relationship between the art of building, the making of community and the conservation of our natural world.

  • Foreword to Form-Based Codes: A Guide for Planners, Urban Designers, Municipalities, and Developers by Daniel G. Parolek, AIA, Karen Parolek and Paul C. Crawford, FAICP (Wiley 2008)

  • The Southeast Area Master Plan in Visalia, California incorporates a comprehensive sustainability strategy in both planning and architecture.

  • Since its founding in 1781, our great city, El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora La Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula, has been visioned, designed and built four times. However, with each successive layer of its development razed and little of the cumulative evidence remaining, the myth has flourished that Los Angeles has no history.

  • Beginning in the early 1990s, the planning and development culture of Southern California began to shift away from sprawl. This was not accomplished by a sudden reversal of citizen attitudes, political climates and professional practices. It was instead induced by a variety of trends, slowly and steadily leading the region toward a more positive view of its culture, its livability prospects and its financial outlook.

  • The American campus-making tradition is an invaluable source of coherence, the source of many wondrous future projects, and a guarantee for the survival of the American university as an institution of coherence and meaning.

  • The form of the New Urbanism is realized by the deliberate assembly of streets, blocks and buildings.

  • A analysis of Tucson's early history and the wanton destruction to the city brought about by misguided urban renewal.

  • Introduction to the 2003 Seaside Prize

  • Traditional Elements of a California Architecture & Urbanism

  • In the work of the New Urbanism, we start with the premise that buildings and the space between (streets and squares) must be a balanced ensemble of pavement, streetwalls, green and building walls.

  • A critique of the New Urbanism with introductions by Elizabeth Moule and Stefanos Polyzoides.

  • The idea of the plaza in human history is born and developed under a number of different impulses: an expression of the power of the state to define a place for public life, through a singular, monumental architectural enclosure.

  • The history of public housing in our country is filled with noble intentions, as it is littered with the unintended consequences of public policy.

  • The suggestion has been made that this gathering be called The Seaside Tapes, giving appropriate remembrance and credit to ‘The Charlottesville Tapes’ meeting of fifteen years ago in Virginia.

  • If I were a young architect, I would find it daunting to access the values supporting the practice of a contemporary Architecture.

  • The charrette is a method of planning, which we have adopted and developed to support our traditional planning practice.

  • Concentrations of civic, institutional, and commercial activity should be embedded in neighborhoods and districts, not isolated in remote, single-use complexes.

  • Sprawl builders and developers call them ‘product’.

  • The foundational text of the Congress for the New Urbanism, which advocates the restructuring of public policy and development practices to support the restoration of existing urban centers and towns within coherent metropolitan regions.

  • Conventional zoning was meant to promote the health and prosperity of the public by regulating zones of exclusive use; in practice, however, appropriate use became much less important than the entitled amount of gross usable space and the physical envelopes of buildings.

  • A lecture given by Elizabeth Moule at the Seaside Institute, which includes a brief account of the drafting of the Charter of the New Urbanism and a discussion of the values that inform it.

  • Downtown Los Angeles has been the historic center of the Southern California region since its inception and Bunker Hill one of its pivotal constituent parts. The development and redevelopment of Bunker Hill in the last one hundred-odd years, provides a special opportunity to observe the process through which the Architecture and Urbanism of Los Angeles was developed during various phases of the city's growth.

  • Exhibition at Barnsdall Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles, California, 1994

  • Stefanos Polyzoides, with Roger Sherwood and James Tice, documents the historical, technical, and cultural forces that shaped the development of this distinctive West Coast building type.

  • Exhibition at Lang Gallery, Scripps College, Claremont, California, 1992

  • In 1991, the Local Government Commission, a private nonprofit group in Sacramento, invited architects Peter Calthorpe, Michael Corbett, Andrés Duany, Elizabeth Moule, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Stefanos Polyzoides and Daniel Solomon to develop a set of community principles for land use planning. Named the Ahwahnee Principles (after Yosemite National Park's Ahwahnee Hotel), the commission presented the principles to about one hundred government officials in the fall of 1991, at its first Yosemite Conference for Local Elected Officials. Many of these principles were incorporated into the Charter of the New Urbanism.

  • Catalog and exhibition at Huntington Library, San Marino, California

  • Exhibition at Baxter Art Gallery, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

  • Exhibition at Ministerio de Obras Publicas Gallery, Madrid; Colegio de Arquitectos, Barcelona; Schindler House Gallery, Los Angeles, California

  • Exhibition at Baxter Art Gallery, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California